CODE-IT SOFTWARE       

   HOME     SERVICES     LINUX SOFTWARE     WINDOWS SOFTWARE     SUPPORT        

 

  LINUX COOL TRICKS: tips, stupid tricks, hacks and hot keys...

Okay - lets get the boring stuff out of the first - Linux "hot keys":

Desktop shortcuts

This section lists common keyboard shortcuts which you can use to operate parts of the desktop (such as windows and the menu bar).

Alt + F1 Open the Applications menu
Alt + F2 Run an application by typing its name in the box which appears
Prt Sc (Print Screen) Take a screenshot of the whole screen
Alt + Prt Sc Take a screenshot of the current window
Shift + Prt Sc Take a screenshot of a selected rectangle on the screen

 

Window shortcuts

Alt + Tab Switch between currently-open windows. Press Alt + Tab and then release Tab (but continue to hold Alt). Press Tab repeatedly to cycle through the list of available windows which appears on the screen. Release the Alt key to switch to the selected window.
Ctrl + Alt + Tab Switch between currently-open windows in all Workspaces. Press Tab repeatedly to cycle through the list of available windows which appears on the screen. Release the Ctrl and Alt keys to switch to the selected window.
Ctrl + Alt + Left/Right Cursor Lets you quickly switch between your Workspaces.

These might not work on every machine, but are reasonably common:

Alt+F7 Moves the current window (can be moved with mouse or keyboard).
Alt+F8 Resizes current window (again, can be moved with mouse or keyboard).
Alt+F9 Minimises current window.
Alt+F10 Maximises current window.
Alt+Space Brings up window menu with with 'Always on Top' and 'Minimise' and 'Maximise' and above commands.

These might change depending on the application you're using, but work for most common applications:

Alt+F5 Returns window to 'normal' or previous size.
Alt+F4 Closes window.

 

Desktop Effects enabled shortcuts

All of the shortcuts listed in this section require Desktop Effects to be enabled.

Ctrl + Alt + Left/Right Cursor Spins the 'cube' that your workspaces reside on, allowing you to select the workspace you wish to use.
Ctrl + Alt + Up Cursor Enables an 'expose' like feature that presents you with all the windows you currently have open, allowing you to select the one you wish to give focus to.
Ctrl + Alt + Down Cursor Unfolds your workspace cube allowing you to see more than one of your workspaces at once, using the left and right cursor keys with this active will allow you to select the workspace you wish to use.
Ctrl + Alt + Tab Switch between currently-open windows across all workspaces.
Super + W Enables the 'scale' effect, it shows all windows from the current workspace.
Super + A Enables the 'scale' effect, it shows all windows from all workspaces.
Super + N Invert colours of the focused window.
Super + M Invert colours for the whole screen.
Super + Mouse Scroll Wheel Zooms in on the screen.
Super + Middle Mouse Button Select a region to zoom into, using a rectangle.
Ctrl + Super + D Toggles 'Show Desktop'.
Alt + Middle Mouse Button Resize focused window.
Alt + Left Mouse Button Move focused window.
Alt + Right Mouse Button Show window menu.
Super + S Zoom out, show workspace switcher

 

Common application shortcuts

These shortcuts do not apply in all applications, but usually perform the functions listed below.

Ctrl + C Copy the selected text/object
Ctrl + X Cut the selected text/object
Ctrl + V Paste/insert the selected text/object
Ctrl + A Select all text
Ctrl + B Make the selected text bold
Ctrl + I Make the selected text italic
Ctrl + U Underline the selected text
Ctrl + N Open a new document or window
Ctrl + S Save the current document
Ctrl + O Open another document
Ctrl + P Print the current document
Ctrl + Z Undo the last change you made
Ctrl + Shift + Z Redo a change that you just undid

 

System shortcuts

Some of these shortcuts will restart important parts of your system. Only use them if you have to.

Ctrl + Alt + Delete Restart the computer immediately, without saving open files
Ctrl + Alt + Plus (numeric keypad) Rotate through supported screen resolutions
Ctrl + Alt + Minus (numeric keypad) Rotate backwards through supported screen resolutions

A list of low-level keyboard shortcuts is available on Wikipedia.


Now that we got that out of the way - lets learn some fun stuff you can do with Linux - in other words - Stupid Terminal Tricks: 

If you need to install this small app - terminal command = "sudo apt-get install cmatrix"

turn your terminal into a matrix display - type the command "cmatrix"

 

If you need to install this small app - terminal command = "sudo apt-get install fortune"

get your quote/ news of the day - type the command "fortune"

 

no need to install anything - get the cow tip of the day -  type the command "apt-get moo"

 

If you need to install this small app - terminal command = "sudo apt-get install cowsay"

have the cow predict your fortune -  type the command "fortune | cowsay"

 

If you need to install this small app - terminal command = "sudo apt-get install sl" 

turn your terminal into a train display - type the command "sl-h"

 

have a set of eyes follow your mouse pointer around  - type the command "xeyes"

 

play star wars - type the command "telnet towel.blinkenlights.nl"

 

If you need to install this small app - terminal command = "sudo apt-get install bb" 

high quality audio-visual demonstration for your text terminal. It is a complete animation that draws using pure text and has background too. Very interesting to watch - type the command "bb"

 

if you need to install this small app (most distros have it installed by default) - terminal command = sudo apt-get install espeak

text 2 speech engine that has many options - type in command "espeak "Want to play a game?""

 

Bet you never thought you'd actually enjoy do'n stuff on the terminal did yah?

 

 

 

Okay- here's a "hack"  you might be amazed at (or not) - I'll have much more "hack'n stuff" on a different page later on (as we go forward with our learning process).

Want to have most anything show up, "speak", play when you activate the terminal?

Here's a screen shot of mine. It also "speaks the text displayed upon activation.

Here's how:

  1. open up the file system and navigate to \etc\bash.bashrc (file)
  2. PLEASE copy and paste it (maybe in your home directory) to be used as a backup in case something drastic goes wrong!
  3. make sure you have any app installed that you want to "call" - in my example it uses "espeak" and "fortune" apps.
  4. at the very bottom of this file copy then paste this code:
    if [ -x /usr/games/cowsay -a -x /usr/games/fortune ]; then
    fortune | cowsay -f tux "Hello mikeB - what are you about to screw up this time?" 
    espeak "Hello mikeB - what are you about to screw up this time?" fi
  5. Of course you'll want to use your name and probably change the text or whatever. Use your imagination and hack on!

I'll be adding content to this page as we on - ain't this fun?

Hack'n the Linux - mikeB

 

 

a no nonsense Wyoming U.S.A. enterprise since 1997

Need any help or support? Please feel free to contact mb@code-it.com

UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF THIS (C) INFORMATION WOULD BE DEEPLY APPRECIATED!